What is a Relationship Without a Little Bit of Loyalty?

Hello viewers! The Oedipus Plays has some interesting content that I would like to talk about every so often, and I hope you find it equally interesting as well 🙂

“Loyalty means nothing unless it has at its heart the absolute principle of self-sacrifice.” -Woodrow Wilson

In class, I have learned that Antigone is the daughter of Oedipus Rex and Jocasta, who would also be the sister of Oedipus because he is the son of Jocasta as well. Despite the weird family connection, she sticks by her old blind father and takes care of him. She helps lead him in exile. She never leaves her father’s side. In this way, she is loyal to him.

Similarly to how Antigone is loyal to her father, I have people in my life that I am loyal to. I am loyal to my parents, and to my aunt and her husband (I have called my aunt ‘auntie’ and her husband ‘uncle Lee’ ever since I was a little, and I don’t think I could ever call them anything else, even if I’m in my 30’s!) I am loyal to my parents by doing my homework every single day, listening to what they have to say, and doing what I am told to do by their requests.

My aunt and her husband are different. Unlike my parents, they actually  take the time to spend time with me and my older brother and do fun outing-activities with us. I love that. Also, their views and opinion of things are very different from my parents’. I never get to experience that here where I live with my parents, and I always feel happy whenever I’m with them. Since they’re always so kind to me and always do things for me, in return, I help them with whatever they ask me to do as favors. I feel more happy and glad to do the favors for them because I know that they have done many generous things for me. I always feel like I have a second family.

All in all, Antigone is loyal to her father and will remain loyal to him always. Likewise, My loyalty to my parents and my aunt and her husband are different, but I am still loyal to them in respectful ways.

https://i2.wp.com/media1.shmoop.com/media/images/large/oedipus-antigone.jpg

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s